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Tesla Semi Spotted At Supercharger Station During Delivery Run

by Ma. Claribelle Deveza June 29, 2020

Tesla-Semi-Supercharger-Station-Q2-2020-Delivery

Featured Image Credit: @sacrementotesla/Twitter 

A Tesla Semi was recently spotted at the Rocklin Center’s Supercharger station. The Semi appeared to be delivering a few Model Y and Model 3 vehicles to reservation holders as part of Tesla's end-of-quarter push. 

The Tesla Semi was charging at the Supercharger station. According to @sacramentotesla, the Semi was using an adapter to charge and used two Supercharger stalls. When the Semi first came out, some people in the Tesla community observed that it used about four or five stalls to charge. 

So it is quite intriguing that the Tesla Semi only needs to use two stalls now. It hints that the EV automaker may have addressed its battery capacity bottleneck issue or has developed a better battery pack for the Semi at least. 

Earlier this month, a leaked email from Elon Musk revealed that Tesla was ready to start volume production of the Semi. “….It’s been in limited production so far, which has allowed us to improve many aspects of the design,” wrote Musk to Tesla employees. The Semi spotted in Rocklin Center charging with only two stalls indicated that Tesla had refined the design of its all-electric Class 8 truck. 

In his email, Musk also hinted at how the Semi’s assembly would be organized. “Production of the battery and powertrain would take place at Giga Nevada, with most of the other work probably occurring in other states,” he wrote.

Currently, Tesla has been focused on negotiating a location for its Cybertruck and Model Y Gigafactory with Texas and Tulsa. However, based on Musk’s email, Tesla might need to find a location for the Semi’s volume production as well. Tesla will still need an assembly facility for the Semi since Giga Nevada will only provide the truck’s battery and powertrain. 

The Tesla Semi’s main competition in the Class 8 truck market would be Daimler Trucks North America (DTNA). Daimler holds up to 40% of the trucking market in the United States. 

Plus, there are other legacy automakers in the trucking market that have taken steps towards electrification and autonomy as well. So Tesla will have some competition in the trucking industry, unlike the passenger vehicle market, where OEMs are still hesitant to accept electrification. 




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