Tesla Owners in South Korea Conduct First Tests of Company's CCS Combo 1

Eva Fox by Eva Fox October 23, 2021

Tesla Owners in South Korea Conduct First Tests of Company's CCS Combo 1

Image: 한테 타/YouTube

Tesla recently unveiled its CCS Combo 1, which went on sale in South Korea. Now, owners in the country have released the first video showing a real testing of the device.

Tesla has officially released the CCS Combo 1 adapter for its proprietary charging standard in South Korea. It retails for 299,200 won (about $255) and, according to Tesla's website, can charge up to 500V and up to 300A, which means the peak is limited to 150kW. The company also announced that it will soon be available for purchase in North America.


The adapter is quite compact, but according to the description of the first users in South Korea, it is relatively heavy. 한테 타/YouTube conducted the first adapter test and shared the results. During charging, the adapter does not heat up, or it becomes slightly warm, which was when charging at a powerful charging station, charging at which is prohibited by the manufacturer (350kW). In addition, when used on some chargers, the adapter was difficult to remove from the charging cable. All tests were carried out on different Tesla vehicles.



Test #1 was at a 400V 120A (48kW) charging station, where a 2021 Model 3 Long Range (LR) received about ~41kW.

Test #2 was carried out at a charging station with the same parameters as test #1, but at a different manufacturer, where the 2021 Model 3 LR received ~38kW.

Test #3 was carried out at a 450V 110A (50kW) charging station where the 2021 Model 3 LR received about ~40kW.

Test #4 was carried out at a 500V 200A (100kW) charging station where the 2021 Model 3 LR received ~74kW.

Test #5 was carried out on a 1,000V 350A (350kW) charging station, which is prohibited by Tesla's instructions. However, 한테 타 made the decision to take a chance so viewers were prepared for the consequences if they ever wanted to test the adapter this way. Here, the 2021 Model 3 LR received about ~108kW, although the author of the video recommended not to use the adapter at such powerful charging stations. The adapter started to warm up slightly during charging.

In Test #6, the host of the video used a 2017 Model S 90D. The charging station was 400V 10A (44kW). However, the car refused to charge, which was predictable enough.

Test #7 used a 2019 Model 3 Standard Range+. Charging was carried out at a 500V 200A (100kW) charging station where ~47kW was obtained, much lower than that of 2021 Model 3 LR.

Test #8 was carried out on a 1,000V 200A (200kW) charging station, where the 2019 Model 3 SR+ received ~66kW.

The first tests gave a real idea of ​​what Tesla owners should expect from their vehicles, which are charged via an adapter at various charging stations.

 

H/T @hsumacher/Twitter

© 2021, Eva Fox | Tesmanian. All rights reserved.

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Article edited by @SmokeyShorts, you can follow him on Twitter






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