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Tesla's First Solar-Powered Supercharger V3 in Asia with China-Spec Connector Goes Live

by Claribelle Deveza December 26, 2019

Tesla-Supercharger-V3-Jinqiao-China

Tesla China officially announced that the first V3 Supercharger station in Asia has been opened to the public. Tesla China made the announcement via Twitter. The post included a video that revealed a couple of neat surprises about the new V3 Supercharger station in China.

The new Tesla charging station is located at Jinqiao, Shanghai, and features a connector that’s specifically made for the Chinese market. Back in 2017, Tesla unveiled dual connecter charge ports— similar to the ones seen in Tesla China’s video—for the Model S and Model X. The automaker unveiled dual connector charge ports so its all-electric fleet could support multiple charging standards. This setup has been adopted for the Model 3 as well.

Tesla-Supercharger-V3-China
Credit: Tesla CN/Twitter

Apart from the China-spec connectors, Tesla China’s V3 Supercharger in Jingqiao is also fitted with a solar system. This allows the electric car maker to adopt a charging infrastructure that is as sustainable as its vehicles.

V3 Superchargers were unveiled in the United States earlier this year in March. According to the release notes under Supercharger Improvements, Model 3 owners could “charge at V3 Supercharger at up to 250 kW peak rates.” All Tesla vehicles are compatible with Supercharger V3, but only the Model 3 can tap into the station’s maximum 250 kW output. This translates to a charging speed of up to 1,000 mph, allowing Model 3 owners to cut their charging times to just around 15 minutes.

Tesla-V3-Supercharger-250kW-output

Credit: Tesla CN/Twitter

Tesla owners using the V3 Superchargers are bound to see several improvements with regards to their charging experience. Supercharger V3 does not utilize charge-splitting, which means that every vehicle in the station will be receiving the system’s maximum output. This is quite different compared to the system adopted for Supercharger V2, which required vehicles to split power with neighboring cars.

The rollout of Supercharger V3 stations in China makes a lot of sense, considering that the country will soon be saturated with vehicles that are perfectly compatible with the next-generation infrastructure. Tesla’s Gigafactory 3, after all, will be producing the Made-in-China Model 3 and Made-in-China Model Y, both of which are compatible with Supercharger V3’s 250 kW output. Tesla’s upcoming vehicles, like the Cybertruck, Roadster, and Plaid Model S and X, will likely be fully capable of tapping into V3’s full output as well.

Featured Image Credit: Tesla CN/Twitter




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